Things to do on the Amalfi Coast

Things to do on the Amalfi Coast

Occupying a stunning stretch of Italian coastline between Naples and Salerno, the Amalfi Coast’s colourful towns, secluded beaches, sheer cliffs, and fine landscapes have been a top gay travel destination for several years. Picturesque and romantic in equal measure, its small towns – exemplified by Positano, Ravello, and Amalfi itself – offer the very best of southern Italy.

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The Michelin-starred kitchen at Ristorante La Caravella counted artists Andy Warhol and Marcel Duchamp among its diners

With so many things to do on the Amalfi Coast, stay in this UNESCO World Heritage Site in style at one of Belmond’s two Amalfi hotels. Relax in the knowledge that Belmond is a brand with strong LGBTQ credentials, and was the first hotel group to appoint a global director to cater to the specific needs of its LGBTQ guests. Belmond Caruso sits within a renovated eleventh-century edifice, offering stunning sea views from its cliffside infinity pool and terraced gardens a short distance from Ravello. Effortlessly styled with antique furniture, the spacious and airy rooms add elegance to any Amalfi stay. The neighbouring Belmond Villa Margherita provides the indulgence of Belmond Caruso in an even more secluded garden setting. Its two exclusive suites boast a similarly classic style and include the services of a private butler and chef.

That said, the Belmond Caruso is home to the popular Belvedere restaurant, which combines unbelievable Amalfi Coast views with a menu of freshly-prepared Mediterranean-inspired dishes. The Michelin-starred kitchen at Ristorante La Caravella has been creating seasonal plates using the finest local ingredients since the early 1960s when it counted artists Andy Warhol and Marcel Duchamp among its diners. Art remains an important part of the overall experience, with the dining space filled with an impressive collection of ceramics, and a gallery of pottery and glassware located next door. While the town of Vietri Sul Mare is the destination of choice for ceramics-lovers due to its variety of craft stalls, it’s Positano’s restaurant Chez Black that truly links food and earthenware, serving each of its dishes on handcrafted ceramics. Located right on the beach, a significant proportion of the menu spotlights traditional Amalfi cuisine, the most notable of which being the house speciality of spaghetti with sea urchins.

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The guaranteed long summer season makes the Amalfi Coast a popular beach destination

Blending the region’s food traditions with an innovative ingredients list is Don Alfonso 1890 in Sant’Agata. Prioritizing a farm-to-table ethic, much of the produce comes from its own off-site farm, while the rest comes from local suppliers. If you find yourself on the island of Capri, check out Da Paolino. Situated under the boughs of a lemon grove, it’s understandable why citrus plays such a large part in the restaurant’s menu. Begin your meal with lemon risotto with prawns, pair it with lemon tagliatoni, and cap it off with homemade limoncello liqueur. To see the best of Capri, you’ll need to step on board a boat and sail to the hidden coves that made the island such a favourite with ancient Rome’s aristocracy. Rome’s second emperor, Tiberius, made the island his home at the start of the first century AD. The remains of his vast Villa Jovis can be explored, the ruins hinting at the former grandeur of the complex. However, you don’t need to sail to Capri to enjoy such a grand seaborne adventure. Opt for an Amalfi Coast tour by kayak and expert local guides will lead you to secluded beaches and caves accessible only by sea. Tours incorporate parts of the five-mile Path of the Gods footpath, and plenty of time to sunbathe, swim, and snorkel, too.

Photo: Stefan Johnson

Photo: Greg Willson

Photo: Jakob Owens

Photo: Stefan Johnson

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Snorkelling is also one of the top activities at Punta Campanella, a marine protected area situated at the point where the bays of Salerno and Naples converge. Back on land, the protected status of the Valle delle Ferriere makes it an untouchSnorkelling is also one of the top activities at Punta Campanella, a marine protected area situated at the point where the bays of Salerno and Naples converge. Back on land, the protected status of the Valle delle Ferriere makes it an untouched wonderland in which to explore the region on foot. About an hour’s walk from Amalfi town, two main hiking trails wind through the rugged landscape of waterfalls and Mediterranean pines. If you can’t make it to the Valle delle Ferriere, get lost in your thoughts in the gardens of Villa Ciambrone outside of Ravello; the highlight is, without doubt, the incredible bay views from the Terrace of Infinity.

The neighbouring coastal town of Minori boasts a cathedral with the oldest belfry of its type in Italy, in addition to an underground museum of saintly relics and reliquaries of solid silver and gold. Continuing the underground theme is the wine cellar at Cantine Marisa Cuomo, where visitors are able to sample the fruits of the unique terroir (soil conditions) and southern Italian sun.ed wonderland in which to explore the region on foot. About an hour’s walk from Amalfi town, two main hiking trails wind through the rugged landscape of waterfalls and Mediterranean pines. If you can’t make it to the Valle delle Ferriere, get lost in your thoughts in the gardens of Villa Ciambrone outside of Ravello; the highlight is, without doubt, the incredible bay views from the Terrace of Infinity. The neighbouring coastal town of Minori boasts a cathedral with the oldest belfry of its type in Italy, in addition to an underground museum of saintly relics and reliquaries of solid silver and gold. Continuing the underground theme is the wine cellar at Cantine Marisa Cuomo, where visitors are able to sample the fruits of the unique terroir (soil conditions) and southern Italian sun.

Photo: Kayle Kaupanger

Photo: Kayle Kaupanger

The guaranteed long summer season also makes the Amalfi Coast a popular beach destination. One of the most beautiful beaches in the area is Cavallo Morto, a white sand beach set beneath the cliffs of Maiori and only accessible by boat. More easily reachable is Gavitella beach in Praiano which, although predominantly comprising pebbles, possesses fine views towards Positano and Capri, and is one of the only beaches on the Amalfi Coast that receives full sun for the whole day. Sunny until the early afternoon, Duoglio beach, between Vietri sul Mare and Amalfi, is a larger version of Gavitella. Meanwhile, the tiny fjord of Furore sees the sun from lunchtime until sunset. Finally, Erchie beach offers 200 metres of sand and a beach club where you can rent sun beds and umbrellas, and dine in the bar and restaurant.

Photo: Jakob Owens

Photo: Jakob Owens

Photo: Jan Tielens

Photo: Jan Tielens

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